Dysphasia
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What is Dysphasia?

A language disorder, where the person experiences an impairment of power of speech, writing or signs and of comprehension of spoken or written language is termed as dysphasia. Due to the similarity in pronunciation, dysphasia is often confused with dysphagia, which is a swallowing disorder. In order to differentiate and abate confusion, the medical world often calls dysphasia by the name “aphasia”.

The literal meaning of aphasia is “no speech”. The speech impairment can vary from no speech at all to a difficulty in naming just a few objects. Children and adults suffering from dysphasia might have trouble with understanding the syntax and semantics of the language, just as they may have problems in perceiving the sounds of the words.

Usually, in problems like dysphasia, there are several other underlying information processing dysfunctions. It is difficult, yet important; to identify the ones that one particular child or person is suffering from.

Due to the problem faced by dysphasic people in understanding the semantics of a language, they may face a lot of stress at home or at school. And the problem is further aggravated as one advances through the grades. Amongst the first problems to show up is reading comprehension difficulties. The kids may initially be thought of as not paying attention in the school.

They will seem confused about what they hear and see, will miss things about them, get confused in a movie or miss an obvious point. This all is termed in medicine world as a dysphasic-like pattern. Due to these dysphasic-like difficulties, people will have difficulty with the subtleties of the language and further, in expressing themselves properly.

Such people are often seen as ones with limited vocabulary or as being non-fluent. Their language is less mature when compared to the other aspects of their development. Dysphasic people can be seen as having a history of developing language late. Though it is also observed that when given time to think, these dysphasic individuals can put forth adequate language.

People with dysphasia are often considered as illogical and their thinking processes not developed. Magical thinking is often seen amongst dysphasic people. Verbal humor is lost with the people suffering from dysphasia, while they can appreciate the visual humor. Due to the disease, the social life of the people suffering from dysphasia suffers. This might lead to rage and outbursts which are more severe than wont of in the then presiding situation.

On the basis of comprehension and fluency of speech, repetition and naming of objects, aphasia can be classified into seven broad categories, namely -- global aphasia, wernicke's aphasia, broca's aphasia, conduction aphasia, transcortical motor aphasia, transcortical sensory aphasia and anomic aphasia.

Causes of Dysphasia

The left side of the brain is responsible for the language and communication in human beings. Any damage caused to it would result in dysphasia. Usually this damage is caused by a stroke, where blood supply to the brain gets interrupted. Other factors that might lead to the damage of the brain are a head injury, inflammation or infection or a brain tumor.

Symptoms of Dysphasia

People with dysphasia will be found to having difficulty in talking, understanding, listening, writing or doing numeral calculations. Even the everyday tasks like shopping or answering the phone might be difficult for them to perform. Despite all this, they can think clearly and understand their feelings.

People suffering from dysphasia have difficulty in comprehension, reading comprehension, Language Comprehension, Abstractions (verbal), Semantic Meaning, Hierarchical Classification of Language, Complex Grammatical Structure, and Word Problems in Math, Verbal Association, Language Delay, Receptive and Expressive Language, Language Output, and Meta-linguistic Function.

Treatment of Dysphasia

As the time passes, dysphasic people may recover to some extent. Many learn to adapt to their situation and live accordingly. Speech therapy can be used effectively to improve their communication. Using techniques like talking slowly and repeating things, using gestures or drawings, and avoiding noisy areas can be of great help in dealing with dysphasia. Apart from these technical helps, the dysphasic people need a lot of emotional support.

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I have a speech problem that when i speak my voice is hoarse and raspy and even high at times. I have heard it's called puberphobia but this has a different name so what could I do if I have this because so far I have done speech therapy but nothing has worked and my next best thing will be surgery.
#1 - Alex B - 09/08/2009 - 12:11
Try avoiding milk and dairy for a couple of weeks and see if it clears up. If it dramatically improves, you may need to stop drinking milk.
#2 - Caryopteris - 02/14/2011 - 23:38
I have had parkinsons disease for 24 yrs. (I'm 62) I have had a DBS implanted (2005) My speech has become increasingly slurred, my voice, low and soft. There arn't speech therapy services available in my area. Is there a website with vocal exercises I can work on to improve my speech. Motor symptoms of PD are fairly well controlled & I think I have most of my marbles (mental status OK)
#3 - Pam B - 10/11/2011 - 15:08
SATISFIED
#4 - kanika - 12/01/2011 - 09:28
quite good
#5 - kanika - 12/01/2011 - 20:51
I never realized I had a speech problem until I got to college. Now, I am growing more and more frustrated because my awareness of my speech limmitations are strongly interfering with my intelectual, familial, professional, and social life. I consider myself a fairly educated person, but I'm afraid to share my ideas, or even speak among friends and family because I'm self concious. My problem is, I know what I want to say, but I cant articulate it. When I do speak, I often stop in the middle of a phrace to find a word (often simple words--especially adjetives and adverbs), and it is very embar[@]ing. However, I feel very confident when I write. I've also noticed that I don't finish sentences, and a listener will finish them for me. I have difficulty comprehending written and spoken language. I also find myself unconsciously repeating (whispering) phrases outloud. I could go on, but based on this list, could you please sort of conduce me in the right direction. I fear I might suffer from Broca's Aphasia, as I was dropped from a second floor (about 9 ft.) on my head when I was two. Thank you
#6 - Eddie - 02/15/2012 - 10:03
I'm having a same difficulty as you Eddie . i know what i want to say but can't articulate it and always looking for the right words especially with on, in, at. I also dropped from our balcony to our basement stairs on my head when I was 7 years old. I am scared to seek help. I hope you read this, you are not alone.


#7 - reno - 04/08/2012 - 13:37
I am having a same difficulty as you Eddie. I know what I want to say but cant articulate it and always searching for a right word which i have to pause for few seconds and i give up . I also fall from our balcony to our basement stairs on my head when i was 7 years old. this started about 5 years ago for me and each year is getting worse. I just dont have a courage to seek help. thanks.
#8 - reno - 04/08/2012 - 13:56
Hello Eddie, I am a 50 year old teacher who works using every mode of communication to fulfill my duties. I want you to know that you should trust yourself and the people whom you communicate with. Stress is, without a doubt, one of the worst enemy of any person who attemps to convey a message. Go for it and you will learn to share your thoughts calmly and
clearly. Nothing can help you more than relaxation and the understanding of your family and friend and still
#9 - Tom, Canada - 04/14/2012 - 01:44
Hello I have to go for a test for dysphasia .I would like to know if it is painful My problem is swallowing my voice is very raspy
#10 - Joan is looking for Gold Horseshoe - 05/07/2012 - 11:42
please anybody have some data about the speech theraby of dysphasia send it to
[email protected]
#11 - asmartquee,egypt - 06/05/2012 - 16:06
My father has severe dysphasia and venal dyspraxia following a severe stroke. Dad tries to formulate words, he thinks them, but he cannot form any words, just bbbb bbb sounds. Occasdionaly some words sneak out when he is not trying. We are at a total loss as to how to help him. He was in rehab for 3 weeks following the strike but the OT did not offer us any advice. Do you have any advice as to where we can get [@]istance as what to do to help him. Appreciate any advice please.
#12 - Sue - 07/11/2012 - 05:27
To Sue, trying contacting your nearest http://www.headway.org.uk as they are very useful and have tons of information. In the meantime remember it can be very frustrating to your father so, speak slowly and clearly, also give him the opportunity to communicate via flash cards which is what I do with clients I work with.
#13 - Susann - 07/29/2012 - 10:00
I AM TRYING TO FIGURE OUT WHY I CANNOT REMEMBER NAMES OF SONGS , PEOPLE , AND I ALWAYS CHANGE WORDS IN A SENTENCE, OR IN A SONG . EXAMPLE. I WILL BE TAKING AND WILL MEAN TOSAY THIS HUMMIS IS GOOD , DO YOU HAVE THE RECIPE. BUT INSTEAD I SAID THUS PUMIS IS GOOD ,DO YOU HAVE THE RECIPE. MY FRIENDS LAUGH AT ME BECAUSE I WILL USALLY THE THE FIRST LETTER OF THE THING I AM TALKING ABOUT RIGHT . BUT IN THIS CASE , JUST YESTERDAY I DID NOT.
#14 - KAREN - 08/16/2012 - 21:48
I AM TRYING TO FIGURE OUT WHY I CANNOT REMEMBER NAMES OF SONGS , PEOPLE , AND I ALWAYS CHANGE WORDS IN A SENTENCE, OR IN A SONG . EXAMPLE. I WILL BE TALKING AND WILL MEAN TO SAY THIS HUMMIS IS GOOD , DO YOU HAVE THE RECIPE? BUT INSTEAD I SAID THUS PUMIS IS GOOD ,DO YOU HAVE THE RECIPE. MY FRIENDS LAUGH AT ME BECAUSE I WILL USALLY THE THE FIRST LETTER OF THE THING I AM TALKING ABOUT RIGHT . BUT IN THIS CASE , JUST YESTERDAY I DID NOT.
#15 - KAREN - 08/16/2012 - 21:52
I had a stroke in '05. since then i have hemiphergic migraines which cause temp. weakenes to paralisis on my left side. (my stroke was on my right side) I also started having problems knowing what i want to say or seeing an object but cant get it out in words. doesn't happen all the time but when it does, i get extremly frustrated. My close friends are use to it and will say the word or words i was thinking about (they know me that well) BUT when it happens in public, its embar[@]ing and people look at me funny. Ive have excepted it but not gonna lie, i wish i didn't have it. :(
#16 - Crystal - 08/26/2012 - 16:37
Karen and Eddie and I have developmental dysphasia. What to do? I have found it is important to know what the condition is. And to have family understand that getting words out in a sentence that is understandable is very difficult. It is important to be confident and to take ones time to say what you want to say. Once I realised what my problem is has helped me to know why it is so hard to remember words, why there are gaps in my thoughts and why people who are listening get bored and start talking before the sentence I am saying is finished. Frustrating for all. But if one knows Why it happens, it helps a great deal.

#17 - John - 10/12/2012 - 04:13
I have dysarthria :speech disorder,there is a home remedy ??? somebody help me ,please
#18 - j. pons - 08/01/2013 - 22:23
I have dysarthria: speech disorder some body help me..is there some home remedies..sent to : [email protected]...Thank you
#19 - j. pons - 08/01/2013 - 22:26
DÅ·sphasia
#20 - Margaret mccusker - 10/19/2013 - 16:02
My husband had a general anesthetic for knee replacement two years ago. because of the risks, we asked for epidural. the anesthetist said that due to his spondylitis, it couldn't be done. the operation was done by a registrar, and the surgeon [@]isted. he has admitted that they have to train up future generations of surgeons, but I feel that my husband has been used to practice on. as a result, and since then, he has all the symptoms of dysphasia, but the MRI scan was inconclusive. it took me fourteen months to get to where we are, and the NHS in his case was very bad. He has difficulty making sentences, forgets words, puts the wrong word into a sentence, reads worse that our seven year old granddaughter, his comprehension is awful, and it will take months of observation for them to give us a diagnosis.
The second knee replacement to correct this blunder at Wrexham hospital was done at gobowen in oswestry, and they did it under epidural, his leg is straight, but his mind, after the first operation is not the same. can anesthetic trigger of dysphasia. please, if anyone knows, can they let me know via our e-mail address. [email protected]
#21 - Wendy - 02/06/2014 - 07:30
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